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Showing posts from August, 2017

Translation of Alexander Blok: The Lightning of Art (Masks on the Street chapter)

This work, which essentially predicts the fall of mankind and all that it has produced, was originally written by Russian Silver-Age poet Alexander Blok in 1909, more than one-hundred years ago. Describing his travels to Italy, once a large, cultural center of European civilization, The Lightningof Art, Blok’s unfinished book, delves into the depths of human nature, art, and technological achievements reached by mankind.

Reflecting and projecting the common intolerance of his day, Blok’s venomous foreword predicts the downfall of humankind caused by technology. Although very pessimistic in its nature, intolerant towards people of low social rank (the working class), and disrespectful towards people of other nationalities, Blok’s text still possesses relatable thoughts and ideas that we, people of the future, must not disregard. It is undeniable that, although his attitude towards technology is filtered by the conservatism of his time, he was close in his predictions that Art, in his un…

Translation of Alexander Blok: The Lightning of Art (Foreword to his unfinished book)

This work, which essentially predicts the fall of mankind and all that it has produced, was originally written by Russian Silver-Age poet Alexander Blok in 1909, more than one-hundred years ago. Describing his travels to Italy, once a large, cultural center of European civilization, The Lightning of Art, Blok’s unfinished book, delves into the depths of human nature, art, and technological achievements reached by mankind.

Reflecting and projecting the common intolerance of his day, Blok’s venomous foreword predicts the downfall of humankind caused by technology. Although very pessimistic in its nature, intolerant towards people of low social rank (the working class), and disrespectful towards people of other nationalities, Blok’s text still possesses relatable thoughts and ideas that we, people of the future, must not disregard. It is undeniable that, although his attitude towards technology is filtered by the conservatism of his time, he was close in his predictions that Art, in his…

"Huge As The Ocean...Infinite As The Sea": Puccini's La Boheme with the Armenian National Philharmonic Orchestra

I'm only a  week or so late on my article on Giocomo Puccini's La Boheme (hehe), with the Armenian National Philharmonic Orchestra and Eduard Topchjan conducting on July 26, 2017 at the Aram Khachaturian Concert Hall. The lovely cast consisted of the same singers who performed at the Opera Gala two days earlier, on July 24, 2017.

Liparit Avetisyan as Rodolfo
Ani Yorentz as Mìmì
Gianpiero Ruggeri as Marcello
Hasmik Torosyan as Musetta
David Babayants as Schaunard
Vazgen Gazaryan as Colline
Gagik Vardanyan as Benoit
Hovhannes Nersesyan as Alcindoro

Avetisyan and Yorentz performed very well together, with harmonious acting and very strong mutual stage presence. The aria duo scene, with Che gelida la manina and Si, mi chiamano Mimi was performed by both exquisitely and the audience could tell that they were engaged in a conversation.
Another dynamic duo was Gianpiero Ruggeri and Hasmik Torosyan, who were not only funny at times but also very heartfelt. Musetta and Marcello were v…